Kenneth J. Botto Research Fellowship

Awards up to $5,000 to support research at the Center for Creative Photography by curators, writers, and researchers investigating the life and work of Kenneth J. Botto; photographers working to incorporate set-up, collage, or constructed imagery; or photographers whose work is a critical comment on political, social, and/or art historical issues in society.

Qualifications: 
Advanced scholars and researchers from any discipline are encouraged to apply. Pre-doctoral applicants must have completed coursework and preliminary examinations for the doctoral degree and must be engaged in dissertation research.
Application process: 

Please send the following documents:

  1. Cover letter
  2. Curriculum vitae of no more than four pages
  3. 500-1,000 word statement detailing your research interests and project and how they will be advanced by study of the Center's archives and print collectionE

Email applications to Leslie Squyres, Archivist and Head of Reference Services.

Application deadline: 
Monday, January 16, 2017
Selection process: 
Selection is based on the quality of the proposed research and its relationship to the Center's collections. Decisions will be announced by email on or before February 28, 2017. Residencies must be scheduled with the Volkerding Study Center staff. Fellowship recipients and their research projects will be announced in the Center's publicity.
Contact information: 
Recipients: 

2016

  • Anton Lee is a PhD scholar, Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory, University of British Columbia, Vancouver and his doctoral dissertation research focuses on the strategic use of visual sequences by a small number of American photographers during the 1970s, whose work wielded great influence on the foundation of photographic discourse in France through the 1980s.
  • David Shneer is the Louis P. Singer Chair of Jewish History, Professor of History, Religious Studies, and Jewish Studies, University of Colorado Boulder. Dr. Shneer’s book project, Grief: The History of the World’s First Holocaust Liberation Photograph and the Man Who Made It, uses Dmitrii Baltermants’s early Holocaust liberation photographs to examine photography—as art, document, object of financial value, and evidence of atrocities—on a global scale.  At the Center, he will study collections in an effort to understand how photographs become commodities.

2015

  • Meaghan L. Beadle, Department of History, University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Project: dissertation research into the photographic language of women’s liberation in order to understand how visual culture shaped and was shaped by the movement. This is What a Feminist Looks Like! Photography and Feminism, 1968-1980
  • Thom Sempere, Photographer. Project:  the photographer Kenneth Botto
  • Professor Mark Van Proyen, San Francisco Art Institute and Corresponding Editor, Art in America. Project: Kenneth J. Botto and the Tradition of Surrealist Photography